Coping with Covid

Fairview UMC Goes Digital

Fairview UMC in Jonesborough, TN has been live-streaming Sunday Worship on Facebook since March 15. and the church is also now holding Adult Sunday School class via Zoom, as well as a Wednesday evening devotional.  Other essential meetings are held via Zoom, such as church council and finance, and a Re-Open the Church Committee meeting was recently held via Zoom.
FUMC is operating under advisement of Three Rivers District Bishop Cindy Taylor and the Coronavirus Task Force, and the Center for Disease Control.  Besides the digital worship and meetings, among the other precautions put in place are: other than Sunday morning worship as allowed, no more than 10 people are allowed in the church and only for essential reasons; the trustees have provided appropriate instructions and supplies for housekeeping; anyone who enters the church is encouraged to use the hand sanitizers placed conveniently all over the church; in order to attend any in-person meetings or worship services, everyone must wear a face mask.
Anyone who would like to join Fairview’s Sunday School or Wednesday devotions and is not receiving the Zoom notifications, please request this access using the Contact Us link that appears at the bottom of every web page.  There is also a link to Facebook there, where the Sunday Worship service can be viewed.
For an up-to-date schedule, please visit https://myfairviewchurch.org/covid-19-preparedness/

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A Believer’s Blog

The following is from a blog on The Call newsletter from Holston Conference UMC, written by Emily Ballard, Student Ministry Assistant Director at Concord United Methodist Church in Knoxville, Tennessee.  It reflects a spirit of acceptance of whatever God gives us, with the reminder that He doesn’t give us anything we can’t handle with His help.  Enjoy!
What a time to be alive!”
“This is what my roommates and I have been saying to each other each day for the last few months.  I’ll admit that when I first brought this phrase into our house, it was typically said under my breath after something didn’t go the way I planned.
“It was said out of frustration and confusion about what was happening in our world.  Trips were cancelled, restaurants were closed, and I was forced to make new plans.  It was a verbal way of coping with finding my new normal.
“Apparently I had been sharing this expression quite often, because before I knew it, my roommates were saying it, too.  When the phrase became the theme of our house, I started to notice how much we were saying it.  However, the tone of the phrase was different now.  Instead of it being a negative, we transformed it into a positive.
“When we cleaned the kitchen:  What a time to be alive!
“We won a trivia contest:  What a time to be alive!
“We made dinner:  What a time to be alive!
“A stray dog ran through the backyard:  What a time to be alive!
“All of a sudden, it became our way of expressing thanks to God for those moments.  In the midst of this chaotic time, we are still alive!
“Whether we say it because Chick-fil-a accidentally gave us two extra sandwiches or because it started to rain the moment we began a game of corn hole in the backyard, we are constantly shouting, “What a time to be alive!”
“In Psalm 100, we are reminded of God’s goodness and our own thanksgiving.  There are so many reasons to give thanks.  We are God’s people.  God created us, and we are his.  The Lord is good.
“When we remember this, there is nothing that can steal our joy.  The last sentence of this scripture says, “For the Lord is good and his love endures forever; his faithfulness continues through all generations.”
“We are still in uncharted waters.  Each day we continue to adapt to a new normal.  No matter your age, gender, race, political affiliation, favorite type of cheese, or whatever, God’s faithfulness remains constant.  God’s love endures through all things and through all times.  There is nothing that can take away God’s love for us, not even during a pandemic.
“I encourage you to find the good in each day.  Shout for joy!  Worship with gladness!  Make a joyful noise!  Give thanks to the Lord!
“And remember that God is always with us.  What a time to be alive.”

Psalm 100 

Shout for joy to the Lord, all the earth.
Worship the Lord with gladness;
come before him with joyful songs.
Know that the Lord is God.
It is he who made us, and we are his;
we are his people, the sheep of his pasture.
Enter his gates with thanksgiving
and his courts with praise;
give thanks to him and praise his name.
For the Lord is good and his love endures forever;
his faithfulness continues through all generations.

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Washing Your Hands Can be Fun

The Center for Disease Control says we should wash our hands with soap and water for 20 seconds, then rinse away all the soap along with any germs in order to stay well.  How many times do doctors and nurses wash their hands every day?  I don’t know exactly but I wonder if they sing a song while they do?  There are plenty of songs that can last for exactly (more or less depending on how fast you sing) 20 seconds.  Here are some fun ones you can try, or teach to your children:
Tops and Bottoms
(Tune: Frere Jacques)

Tops and Bottoms, Tops and Bottoms, (Rub top and bottom of hands)
In between, In between, (Rub fingers inside on both hands)
All around our hands, All around our hands, (Just like it says)
Then we wash. Bam, Bam, Bam.

Wash, Wash, Wash Your Hands
(To the tune of Row, Row, Row Your Boat):

Wash, wash
Wash your hands
Wash them nice and clean.
Scrub them here (with hand motion scrubbing together)
Scrub them there (with hand motion scrubbing tops of hands)
And scrub them in between (with hand motion scrubbing between fingers).

Wash, wash, wash, your hands
Play our handy game
Rub and scrub, scrub and rub
Germs go down the drain HEY!
Wash, wash, wash, your hands
Play our handy game
Rub and scrub, scrub and rub
Germs go down the drain HEY!

This is the Way We Wash Our Hands
(To the tune of Mulberry Bush):

This is the way we wash our hands
Wash our hands
Wash our hands
This is the way we wash our hands
Before we eat our food.

If You’re Happy and You Know It Wash Your Hands!

If you’re happy and you know it,
Wash your hands!
If you’re happy and you know it,
Wash your hands!
If you’re happy and you know it,
then your face will surely show it,
If you’re happy and you know it,
Wash your hands!

Twinkle, twinkle little star

Twinkle, twinkle little star,
Look how clean my two hands are,
Soap and water, wash and scrub,
Get those germs off rub-a-dub,
Twinkle, twinkle little star,
Look how clean my two hands are.

The soap on your hands
(Tune: Wheels on the Bus)

The soap on your hands goes sud, sud, sud.
Sud, sud, sud.
Sud, sud, sud.
The soap on your hands goes sud, sud, sud.
And the germs go down the drain.

To the tune of Jolene by Dolly Parton at https://youtu.be/Ixrje2rXLMA

All clean, all clean, all clean, all clee-ee-eean. I’m begging of you, don’t infect my man.

All clean, all clean, all clean, all clee-ee-eean. Wash your hands as often as you can.

Washing, washing, washing, washiiiiiiing I’m singin’ this song While I wash my hands

Rinsing, rinsing, rinsing, rinsiiiiing And gonna dry them Just because I can.